Tupock

California-bred melomane

The Robots come on stage 2014

Daft Punk Grammy Performance to Feature Stevie Wonder, Pharrell, Nile Rodgers, and More. 

Very excited to watch this performance (even if its just via television/lifestream). Lucky enough to say i’ve seen the great Stevie Wonder and only been a reach away from Nile Rodgers this summer, but cannot wait to see them do their thang all together (Pharrell too). 

Will this performance spark a tour?! Probably not… 

*dreams* 

Chromeo releases a new one from their upcoming White Women. This groovy track features Toro y Moi. Another high energy track making me pretty excited for this album…

Happy Listening 

While studying for finals a couple weeks ago, I kept a few 8tracks playlists on constant repeat. Stumbled across this electronic group called Beat Connection.

Here’s the ODESZA remix that got me hooked

Now give these guys a listen and maybe even catch them on their tour: http://beatconnection.bandcamp.com

Happy Listening ;) 

MGMT @ The Tabernacle 11/24

Ever since the release of their six-song EP Time to Pretend in 2005, American indie band MGMT has been the paragon of 21st century psychedelic rock music. This group manages to collect all the pop, rock, dance and electronic sounds from the past 40 years, mix them up in an idiosyncratic way and then deliver them in a manner that can only be called novel.

Though this indie band’s stage presence is just as low-profile as the group itself, the dream-like effect they produce via sound and stage set is so enrapturing that they always grasp the crowd regardless of their passivity and hipster jadedness.

This Sunday at The Tabernacle, MGMT dazzled a music hall full of indie genre fans. Despite the odd day of the week, this sold-out show filled the venue and reaped a high energy that had everyone feeling electric. The concert was not only an exceptionally agreeable auditory experience (despite many jumbled reviews of the band’s live performances), but it was also extremely aesthetically pleasing. The hallucinogenic patterns offset on the stage, in addition to the chromatic lighting on their set, channeled a jumble of the album’s retro-inspired artwork.

Opening the evening was a slightly similar-sounding indie rock band called Kuroma, headed by one of MGMT’s touring members Hank Sullivant. This group, whose soon-to-be-released full-length album Kuromaroma is being produced by MGMT’s very own Ben Goldwasser, got the energy flowing to prepare the crowd for the main act.

Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser, MGMT’s two founders, songwriters and front men who formed the band while studying together at Wesleyan University, shared the stage with a few background members who complemented their prowess on the guitar and keyboard, respectively. They opened up with the particularly unorthodox “Flash Delirium” from their 2010 album Congratulations, and then deftly launched into their more popular tracks without hesitation. Maybe they’re just a little too cool to save those for the end.

They began building up the excitement with a slew of songs from their sprightly debut album Oracular Spectacular, such as “Time to Pretend,” “The Youth” and “Pieces of What.” Next, they jumped into one of the most in-demand songs from this album and arguably the band’s most popular song, the disco-vibing “Electric Feel,” made popular by French duo Justice’s Grammy-winning remix and a slew of commercials and movies. This track, made up of fun, sexy and “punny” lyrics is a crowd-pleaser (“Saw her in the amazon / with the voltage running through her skin” is just one of many memorable moments from the song.) Everyone in the room grew adrenalized as the band adapted the track into an extended stage version of drawn-out pauses and prolonged hooks.

The groovy ambience was taken to a new level as they proceeded directly into “Kids,” a playful track about the freedoms of childhood, also off their sought-after debut album. This popular song was easily received by the crowd and transformed the show into a full-on festival-style dance party.

Although the group focused more on their instruments and skillful performance than the crowd in front of them, as per usual, they seemed to be impressed by the vigor they garnered in the Atlanta concert hall. “You’re the best crowd we’ve had in a long time,” lead vocalist Andrew VanWyngarden remarked upon returning to the stage for their encore.

The band closed the show with the euphoric “Alien Days” off their new self-titled album released in early September. The jubilant tempo of this track was complimented by the stage set, which pictured brightly colored abstract images of aliens and feet to accompany the song’s perfectly paradoxical lyrics “one foot leads to another.” And if that wasn’t trippy enough for the audience, this last track’s set also included a remote control UFO that hovered above the congregation of music fans and had many wondering if they were wearing 3D glasses.

And that served as an amusing ending to a great career-encompassing show — and a nice way to revamp a regular lazy Sunday

Published Article here: http://www.emorywheel.com/mgmt-dazzles-indie-fans-at-the-tabernacle/

Profile: Jake Bugg
At last year’s Coachella Music and Arts Festival, one of the most highly distinguished festivals in the world, solo artist Jake Bugg stood meekly on a side stage.
He performed during a short daytime slot and garnered a very small crowd of fans (which happened to include myself).
But since then, this just-barely-adult British artist has performed for enormous crowds, opening for bigger names including Oasis’ Noel Gallagher and the Stone Roses within the past year.
It’s been about two years since the recording of his first album, but Bugg is on the move with his career and is slowly growing up and forming an identity.
On the surface, he seems to be the epitome of your average young British indie teen: beginning his career in a garage, dropping out of school at age 16, publicly condemning current pop music.
When compared to similarly folky Mumford & Sons, Bugg (born Jacob Kennedy) rebuked the group as some “posh farmers with banjos.”
Bugg taught himself to play guitar at age 12 while living a lower-class life with a single working mother.He grew up unglamorously and, in his music, sheds light on some rough childhood stories, making for some notably vivid lyrics.
In the song entitled “Seen It All,” he admits to taking “a pill or maybe two,” crashing a party at “a local house belonging to a gangster’s crew” and getting warned by a friend that “everyone here has a knife.”
In another number aptly titled “Trouble Town,” Bugg opens and closes with “stuck in speed bump city / where the only thing that’s pretty / is the thought of getting out” and explicates further with “kick the bottom make troubles flee / smoke until our eyes would bleed.”
Nonetheless, what makes Bugg seemingly different than his underprivileged garage-band counterparts is that he actually got out of that “trouble town” and is making a name for himself.
With his first full-length work topping UK charts and another album in the making — this time in Def Jam founder Rick Rubin’s studio with a number of seasoned musicians — Bugg is slowly but surely squeezing his way into the independent and folk rock scene.
In Bugg’s self-titled debut album, this 19-year old singer-songwriter channels an early Bob Dylan and Neil Young, with especially folky acoustic tracks such as “Two Fingers” and “Lighting Bolt.” All of his songs sound sincere and unaffected, almost as if they were recorded on an old, rusty microphone in a backyard barn somewhere.
In “Two Fingers” (his first release), Bugg presents his unruly teenage Brit persona while acknowledging his escape from his Nottingham home.
He addresses that he has “some things to be proud of” and “some stuff to regret” but ultimately states, in an explosive and positively blissful chorus, that he’s “alive but here to stay.”
On his soon-to-be-released album, titled Shangri La after Rubin’s Malibu studio, Bugg appears to explore some faster and heftier blues sounds and experimentation with the electric guitar.
Bugg told Rolling Stone that he feels like he’s coming back with a more proficient and experienced singing voice on this next album.
Despite Bugg’s poor grammar and almost cockney-sounding accent, he’s an extremely talented songwriter and has produced so much work in so little time that critics have even questioned whether it’s too soon for the release of a new album.
He still has the vibe of a rather “low-key” artist here in the States, but back in the United Kingdom he has already played large shows — not to mention dating international supermodel Cara Delevigne.
To boot, none of this seems to be provoking him to acknowledge his rising status.
Jake Bugg has been named one of the best new singer-songwriters of our era, yet he continues to live the simpleton life of shaggy hair and Marlboro cigarettes, while manifesting the “striving musician” character.

« Click photo for link to published article»

Profile: Jake Bugg

At last year’s Coachella Music and Arts Festival, one of the most highly distinguished festivals in the world, solo artist Jake Bugg stood meekly on a side stage.

He performed during a short daytime slot and garnered a very small crowd of fans (which happened to include myself).

But since then, this just-barely-adult British artist has performed for enormous crowds, opening for bigger names including Oasis’ Noel Gallagher and the Stone Roses within the past year.

It’s been about two years since the recording of his first album, but Bugg is on the move with his career and is slowly growing up and forming an identity.

On the surface, he seems to be the epitome of your average young British indie teen: beginning his career in a garage, dropping out of school at age 16, publicly condemning current pop music.

When compared to similarly folky Mumford & Sons, Bugg (born Jacob Kennedy) rebuked the group as some “posh farmers with banjos.”

Bugg taught himself to play guitar at age 12 while living a lower-class life with a single working mother.
He grew up unglamorously and, in his music, sheds light on some rough childhood stories, making for some notably vivid lyrics.

In the song entitled “Seen It All,” he admits to taking “a pill or maybe two,” crashing a party at “a local house belonging to a gangster’s crew” and getting warned by a friend that “everyone here has a knife.”

In another number aptly titled “Trouble Town,” Bugg opens and closes with “stuck in speed bump city / where the only thing that’s pretty / is the thought of getting out” and explicates further with “kick the bottom make troubles flee / smoke until our eyes would bleed.”

Nonetheless, what makes Bugg seemingly different than his underprivileged garage-band counterparts is that he actually got out of that “trouble town” and is making a name for himself.

With his first full-length work topping UK charts and another album in the making — this time in Def Jam founder Rick Rubin’s studio with a number of seasoned musicians — Bugg is slowly but surely squeezing his way into the independent and folk rock scene.

In Bugg’s self-titled debut album, this 19-year old singer-songwriter channels an early Bob Dylan and Neil Young, with especially folky acoustic tracks such as “Two Fingers” and “Lighting Bolt.” All of his songs sound sincere and unaffected, almost as if they were recorded on an old, rusty microphone in a backyard barn somewhere.

In “Two Fingers” (his first release), Bugg presents his unruly teenage Brit persona while acknowledging his escape from his Nottingham home.

He addresses that he has “some things to be proud of” and “some stuff to regret” but ultimately states, in an explosive and positively blissful chorus, that he’s “alive but here to stay.”

On his soon-to-be-released album, titled Shangri La after Rubin’s Malibu studio, Bugg appears to explore some faster and heftier blues sounds and experimentation with the electric guitar.

Bugg told Rolling Stone that he feels like he’s coming back with a more proficient and experienced singing voice on this next album.

Despite Bugg’s poor grammar and almost cockney-sounding accent, he’s an extremely talented songwriter and has produced so much work in so little time that critics have even questioned whether it’s too soon for the release of a new album.

He still has the vibe of a rather “low-key” artist here in the States, but back in the United Kingdom he has already played large shows — not to mention dating international supermodel Cara Delevigne.

To boot, none of this seems to be provoking him to acknowledge his rising status.

Jake Bugg has been named one of the best new singer-songwriters of our era, yet he continues to live the simpleton life of shaggy hair and Marlboro cigarettes, while manifesting the “striving musician” character.

« Click photo for link to published article»


                     Album Review- Days Are Gone



For fans of SoCal-bred trio HAIM, it certainly doesn’t feel like this group of sisters only just released their debut album. The piece of work collectively known as Days Are Gone,which has been in the making for six-some odd years, is a compilation of tracks sure to be enjoyed by anyone in the age range of early teens to the baby boomer generation.
Like many great albums, what makes this new record such a marvel is its ability to be nostalgic for the past, yet fresh in its sound and ideas. However, this record seems to have done it better than almost any other in the atmosphere right now, and its current spotlight in the music media is most definitely serving it justly.
Be that as it may, this group of young sisters didn’t create a top-charting record in both the UK and the US out of the blue. Danielle, Este, and Alana Haim have been creating music together since they were little girls in their family band, Rockinhaim. As they grew up and slowly detached from both Rockinhaim and another all-female group they were part of for a short time called the Valli Girls, these sisters have staked their claim in the alternative and independent music scene. They have close connections with prominent bands such as Phoenix, Vampire Weekend, Arctic Monkeys and The Strokes.
But these relationships appear to have done much more for HAIM than just attract attention. When listening to Days Are Gone, a little dabble of influence from each of these aforementioned bands can be heard within any given track, from the pop tempos to the crisp lyrics to the high-pitched guitar riffs.

It’s hard to find a “chick band” today quite like HAIM. Most critics claim that Stevie Nicks is the best comparison to each of these sisters, and in my opinion, they are not far off the from the truth. The album’s opening track, “Falling,” is composed of confident, deep, yet feminine voices reminiscent of the young Nicks in Fleetwood Mac tracks like “Gypsy.” A few tracks later is “Honey & I,” a slower tempo, breathy song that is light on the drums, similar to Fleetwood Mac’s “Never Going Back Again,” from their most famous album, Rumours. Not to mention, one of HAIM’s first songs out in the music atmosphere was a cover of “Hold Me,” recorded for the Fleetwood Mac tribute album, Just Tell Me That You Want Me.
So though “vintage” may seem like a good adjective to describe this band, I think “eclectic” does it better. Though the hippie aura of Stevie Nicks is definitely the most salient likeness to the work this band has created, tracks such as “The Wire,” which rivals Lana Del Ray’s “Summertime Sadness” for best current melancholy-pop song, combines the heavy voice of lead singer Este channeling an inner Diana Ross with her sister Danielle’s daintier, Sheryl Crow-like vocals.
Meanwhile, their track  “Don’t Save Me,” which comes off the same album, sounds nothing like any of the previously mentioned tracks; and that is the beauty of this band. Not many artists can create a song that sounds like Leona Lewis vocals over the instrumentals of a Duran Duran song and make it really work. The chorus of the song, which welds track overlays with quick, confident lyrical repetitions, will surely send goose bumps over any sane person’s body.
And though this number seems dissimilar to the others on the album, it shares a noteworthy feature with many of its neighboring tracks. This fusing characteristic is the presence of harmonies and counterpoints between all three girls’ very different voices that creates the enrapturing feminine reverberation most notorious to this group.
Having said that, it is true that HAIM as a band has still yet to become as “notorious” as their musical counterparts. But after playing in the UK’s premier Glastonbury Festival this year, receiving multiple spreads in magazines like Rolling Stone, topping BBC’s “Sound of 2013” poll, and creating an album that Huffington Post has dubbed as “endlessly, impossibly” and “intoxicatingly listenable,” they surely have a glistening future ahead of them.
             
 [[click photo for published article]]

 

 

                     Album Review- Days Are Gone

For fans of SoCal-bred trio HAIM, it certainly doesn’t feel like this group of sisters only just released their debut album. The piece of work collectively known as Days Are Gone,which has been in the making for six-some odd years, is a compilation of tracks sure to be enjoyed by anyone in the age range of early teens to the baby boomer generation.

Like many great albums, what makes this new record such a marvel is its ability to be nostalgic for the past, yet fresh in its sound and ideas. However, this record seems to have done it better than almost any other in the atmosphere right now, and its current spotlight in the music media is most definitely serving it justly.

Be that as it may, this group of young sisters didn’t create a top-charting record in both the UK and the US out of the blue. Danielle, Este, and Alana Haim have been creating music together since they were little girls in their family band, Rockinhaim. As they grew up and slowly detached from both Rockinhaim and another all-female group they were part of for a short time called the Valli Girls, these sisters have staked their claim in the alternative and independent music scene. They have close connections with prominent bands such as Phoenix, Vampire Weekend, Arctic Monkeys and The Strokes.

But these relationships appear to have done much more for HAIM than just attract attention. When listening to Days Are Gone, a little dabble of influence from each of these aforementioned bands can be heard within any given track, from the pop tempos to the crisp lyrics to the high-pitched guitar riffs.

It’s hard to find a “chick band” today quite like HAIM. Most critics claim that Stevie Nicks is the best comparison to each of these sisters, and in my opinion, they are not far off the from the truth. The album’s opening track, “Falling,” is composed of confident, deep, yet feminine voices reminiscent of the young Nicks in Fleetwood Mac tracks like “Gypsy.” A few tracks later is “Honey & I,” a slower tempo, breathy song that is light on the drums, similar to Fleetwood Mac’s “Never Going Back Again,” from their most famous album, Rumours. Not to mention, one of HAIM’s first songs out in the music atmosphere was a cover of “Hold Me,” recorded for the Fleetwood Mac tribute album, Just Tell Me That You Want Me.

So though “vintage” may seem like a good adjective to describe this band, I think “eclectic” does it better. Though the hippie aura of Stevie Nicks is definitely the most salient likeness to the work this band has created, tracks such as “The Wire,” which rivals Lana Del Ray’s “Summertime Sadness” for best current melancholy-pop song, combines the heavy voice of lead singer Este channeling an inner Diana Ross with her sister Danielle’s daintier, Sheryl Crow-like vocals.

Meanwhile, their track  “Don’t Save Me,” which comes off the same album, sounds nothing like any of the previously mentioned tracks; and that is the beauty of this band. Not many artists can create a song that sounds like Leona Lewis vocals over the instrumentals of a Duran Duran song and make it really work. The chorus of the song, which welds track overlays with quick, confident lyrical repetitions, will surely send goose bumps over any sane person’s body.

And though this number seems dissimilar to the others on the album, it shares a noteworthy feature with many of its neighboring tracks. This fusing characteristic is the presence of harmonies and counterpoints between all three girls’ very different voices that creates the enrapturing feminine reverberation most notorious to this group.

Having said that, it is true that HAIM as a band has still yet to become as “notorious” as their musical counterparts. But after playing in the UK’s premier Glastonbury Festival this year, receiving multiple spreads in magazines like Rolling Stone, topping BBC’s “Sound of 2013” poll, and creating an album that Huffington Post has dubbed as “endlessly, impossibly” and “intoxicatingly listenable,” they surely have a glistening future ahead of them.

             

 [[click photo for published article]]

 

 

I was totally stoked when I first saw images of Daft Punk's new look and helmets designed by Yves St. Laurent for Random Access Memories and their new beginnings with Columbia Records…but what Spanish magazine Fucking Young! spread in their newest editorial caught my eye more than the sequined sport coats and metallic pendants…

It seems the latest season’s trend of graphic patterns has made it onto some newly-designed robo heads. Designers such as Dolce & Gabbana and Moschino apparently contributed to these beautiful pieces of art. But are they actually to be worn by Guy-Manuel and Thomas Bangalter?

Who knows… 

I was just trying to be cool…

image

This past Thursday I was strolling through the Atlanta airport when a few disheveled yet chic men came scurrying past me with guitars and leather bags. One of them caught my eye as someone familiar, so I kept an eye on them as I walked to my gate. As they sat down in a corner together, I realized that I recognized one of these messy-haired guys as Laurent Brancowitz from the one and only, Phoenix.One of the dudes in his group was wearing a denim jacket with the same rainbow logo that’s on the jacket worn in the ‘Trying To Be Cool’ music video. Nobody was around them and I was traveling alone, so I finally I garnered up the courage to go up  and have a chat. These frenchmen were totally laid back while my heart was racing at the speed of lightening, but we exchanged some words about their shows I’ve seen and where they were headed next, they shared a bag of Doritos with me, and I got a cute little picture. And after looking at them for a while, I realized it was band- member Christian Mazzalai who had given me his spot in a sandwich line only moments earlier…

Pretty cool if I do say so myself…

  1. [Pictured Left-Right: Christian Mazzalai, Laurent Brancowitz, me, Deck D’Arcy]
Outside Lands makes it to my dorm room 

Outside Lands makes it to my dorm room 

The Killers have come out with a new 80’s feeling single that will be featured on their newest album Direct Hits, which will celebrate the band’s 10th year together. Though I often think of this group as a thing of my past and get nostalgic for albums like Hot Fuss, Sam’s Town, and Sawdust, I like what I hear with ‘Shot At The Night’. I’ve always been a big fan of older grooves, so when I hear anything redolent of ‘Jessie’s Girl’ i’m tempted to continue listening. Not to mention, M83’s Anthony Gonzalez had something to do with this one…totally a plus.

I’m looking forward to hearing the rest of this record in a few months, and who knows, maybe i’ll have to see The Killers for a third time?